Emerging Technologies to Watch 2013

The newly released 2013 Horizon Report gives us a glimpse into the classrooms of the near future. If you are not familiar with this report, take a close look! How can our schools benefit from this report? All school leaders who focus sharply on emerging technology trends can effectively plan for what students need and how schools can prepare.

By taking the time to look at the information presented, school or organizational leaders will note how quickly these changes are impacting our world and indeed our own lives on a daily basis. As our schools are also greatly affected, action is needed to ready our schools and organizations for the changes ahead.

The Horizon Report has been published since 2002 and is the result of collaborative effort fostered by NMC (New Media Consortium). Released in January, it highlights emerging technology which impact teaching, research, learning and creative inquiry in higher education. A timeline is created which details when these technologies are set to have the most impact in those areas. A K-12 version was recently released in June of 2013. In researching the report international educational leaders across many sectors come together with technologists, business leaders and others. The structure of the report is a compelling one which gives us clear insight into means for implementation.  It is a must read for educators.

 

This video discussed the summary of the higher ed edition of the report

Main Areas of the Horizon Report

  1. Technology Trends with Timeline
  2. Key Trends
  3. Challenges

Key Trends Identified in the Horizon Report

  • Paradigm shift to online programs, hybrid learning and collaborative models
  • Social Media is changing the way people interact, communicate and share or present ideas
  • Openness is becoming valued – via transparency and access to data and information
  • Students are more often bringing their own technology devices to schools due to adjusted school policies and mobile pricing models
  • Abundance of online resources and relationships are contributing to the discussions of a changing role for educators

Emerging Technologies List

  • Cloud Computing – One Year or Less
  • Mobile Learning – One Year or Less
  • Open Content – Two to Three Years
  • Learning Analytics – Two to Three Years
  • 3D Printing – Four to Five Years
  • Virtual and Remote Laboratories – Four to Five Years

Critical Challenges

  • Ongoing professional development must be made part of the culture of schools be applied
  • Educator innovative practice is very important and should be fostered by both policy and attitude
  • New viable virtual and online models of education are available and are challenging traditional models
  • Attention must by paid by K-12 to the increasing blending of both formal and informal learning
  • Personalized learning support needs to be expanded in schools

Tips for Applying the Horizon Report

  1. Distribute to Stakeholders; Parents, Teachers, Board Members and Students (pdf)
  2. Involve curriculum leaders to forge connections to academic aims
  3. Foster ongoing professional development both offered to and delivered by teachers
  4. Form an Innovations Team. Plan regular followup meetings. Share results with school community.
  5. Discuss Trends and Challenges. Share the Communique developed for use with the Horizon Report
  6. Explore Technologies to Watch. View Supporting data, articles and examples
  7. Seek Supporting technologies for academic and organizational goals
  8. Connect with success – Plan to visit or connect with schools applying these technologies
  9. Plan to pilot new technologies. Plan for ongoing evaluation.
  10. Review technology plans and budgets.  As technology evolves our plans and policies must follow suit.
  11. Keep an eye on the horizon. Continue to evaluate new developments. Follow developments and news on the Horizon Report 2013 via Facebook, Twitter #NMchz, Wiki and NMC app.

“In every work of genius, we recognize our once rejected thoughts.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

This yearly report is one I always look forward to. What I find most validates the importance of this study is their past reporting. Take a look back at reports from past years and you will see how on target these reports have been. School and organizational leaders are advised to take a close look at the results of this report and to take action on behalf of the population or the students they serve.

Our students depend on their educational leaders to foster a relevant, engaging learning environment in tune with today’s world. Keeping eyes tuned to the horizon’ will be an essential part of a transformation in tune with what is to come.

 

Related Links

Emerging Technologies to Watch – 2012 on TechConnects

Horizon Retreat Wiki

Horizon Project Main Page

Horizon Project Navigator

COSN – Consortium for School Networking  

This post is crossposted on SchoolCIO a division of TechLearning

5 Classrooms Hearing News on the New Pope

Washington Post via Michael Sohn/AP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As news unfolded recently about the newly elected pope, people around the world were in close touch with the news. Whether via tweets, television, live stream, text or other means, the word traveled fast! This Washington Post article discusses some means of media access and how it has changed over time.

In talking with my son, he recalled being in his 8th grade classroom when Pope Benedict was elected. This memory stayed with him as I am sure thememory of this week’s new papal election will stay with many for years to come.

On the east coast, schools had let out by the time the identity of Pope Francis was announced. They did however, watch prior coverage such as news of the white smoke.  Below are some responses shared on twitter on how classrooms learned this news.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike Rogers school in St. Paul, MN had a chance to learn about the conclave in advance.They were on break when the pope was announced but the surely felt connected to the process because of all of the work they had done in advance.

 

5 Educational Sites for Learning about the Papal Election

As the Papal Conclave gets underway, the web is rich with sites and resources for teaching about the process.  Sorting through the sites for the most accurate and education ones can be quite a challenge. A number of good sites were shared recently in the weekly twitter chat #CatholicEDchat. In this post, I explore some sites and offer a few suggestions for those looking to use them in the classroom.

I recently worked with teachers from a local Catholic school on a professional development day. We explored the of the links below.

How Do They Choose the Pope

This video from Busted Halo explains both the tradition and the process involved in the papal conclave. It tells process succinctly and in an engagingly, interesting way.

 

Adopt a Cardinal

www.adoptacardinal.org – This site allows visitors to randomly generate the name of or ‘adopt’ a Cardinal. It gives facts about the selected Cardinal such as age, location and more. Thanks to @barbinnebraska for this one!

Visual Papal Conclave

http://vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/en/the-vatican/come-si-elegge-il-papa/ -This interactive by the Vatican Insider provides a visual tour of the Vatican along with the conclave process included. It is beautifully done, concise and informational.

 Electing a Pope

http://electingthepope.net/ – This is an educational site created by a group of bloggers, writers and educators. This site is both comprehensive and informative and is a valuable resource for those exploring the topic.

Cardinals Active on Twitter

This list of Cardinals on Twitter is set up by Fr. Roderick. It is an easy to ‘follow’ list which is broken down by country.

Sadlier Prayer Cards –

Classes can download these prayer cards and use them in prayers supporting the Cardinals in the conclave.

As we explored the sites, teachers creatively shared many ideas on how they could use these sites. Also, thanks to Dave M for telling us about the video above!

Ways to Use Papal Conclave Resources in the Classroom

1. Younger Students – Share the Visual Papal Conclave on a large screen or smartboard. Students can listen and learn visually. They can generate questions and explore answers as a class.

2. Teachers can work with a classroom students or groups of students ‘adopt’ a cardinal. They can then do further research on that cardinal and the area he is from. Students can pray for their selected cardinal.

3. Teachers can use the How To Choose video or the comprehensive www.electingthepope.net to use as a springboard for further research. Students can fill out a KWHL chart to check their knowledge and explore questions they may have.

4. Students can role play or re-enact the process to form a deeper understanding and connection. Any of the above resources can inform their work.

5. Students and teachers can follow twitter accounts of cardinals. Although media updates may be at a minimum during the conclave itself, these tweets can prove a valuable resource going forward as the new pope is elected and takes his place in Rome.

I hope these sites are helpful. Please share any sites or lessons that you have found for this purpose.

 

Digital Citizenship Lessons

One topic that continues to be of interest and importance for schools and families is Digital Citizenship. How can we interact safely and appropriately online? The topic of citizenship comes in to play in a very big way. Are we being considerate of others in our words, deeds and actions? Looking out for others both locally and globally online is the trademark of a good ‘digital citizen’.

Today, I spoke with a group of teachers at St. Bernadette School on the topic of safety and digital ciitzeship. The goal of the time we spent together was to explore the many types of resources online for teaching digital citizenship. The school is proactive in aims to educate parents, teachers and students on the topic. They had many great ideas for supporting teachers and parents with online safety and citizenship.

I used a web 2.0 tool called Mentormob to create a playlist of sites. This is an effective tool to use because it allows you to easily add resources. These resources display the webpage and from there you can easily show the site and return quickly to the playlist. It is a nice and interactive way to present various websites.

What resources should be added to this list?

Create your own Playlist on MentorMob!
Related Posts
Getting Started with Digital Citizenship – TechConnects
D is for Digital Citizenship – TechConnects

Educator Use of Social Networks

When I first began to use twitter, I thought it an unusual concept. What could I say and who would I follow? What would communicating openly look like? What could it possibly have to offer educators?

That was September of 2008. I found out quickly that it was an incredible and powerful tool.  Once I began to use it, I quickly realized the immense benefits in terms of professional learning, building community and shared ideas.  A study I came across this week underscored those benefits and caused me to reflect on what drew me in.

Making a Social Network Meaningful

What was really beneficial to me in this shift was how I happened upon Twitter. It was in a workshop held for 20 of our high schools in the Archdiocese of Phila. We had 5 people from each school including administrators and teachers. In looking back what got me hooked was knowing I’d be connecting initially to people I already knew.

The fact that others in our schools were getting onto Twitter meant a lot to me. I wanted to delve into it myself. The fact that our workshop was being led by others well versed in using twitter did too. (Willrich45, snbeach)
It was:

  • Social
  • Professionally Enriching
  • An Place to Connect with Like-Minded Educators

What Does the Research Say?

In reading this article posted in Edweek, I recalled what drew me in and still does! – connecting with like minded individuals who shared the same interests.

The article highlights data collected by MMS Education noting a trend towards private social networking and online communities. Though open and public social networking is here to stay, private communities have a solid base and that base if growing! Private communities allow for both a more targeted and seemingly safer way to connect with others for educators.

26 percent of teachers said they would join a new social network tailored to educators in the next year, while only 5 percent said they would join a new network for personal use

Social networks are now an integral part of the lives of many. Perhaps this study reflects your own practice. If so, what do you find to be most beneficial to you?

As school leaders and teacher leaders, will you encourage others to join a social network for educators? Will you build a social network of your own?

 


 

Too Much Texting

It’s likely that you have a smartphone. If not, most regular phones allow us to send text messages. We as a society have gradually gotten somewhat used to being available by text 24/7.  What if any conversations should we be having about Texting Etiquette?

According to Shelly Turkle, a clinical psychologist and the founder of MIT’s  Initiative on Technology and Self, “The pull of these devices is so strong, that we’ve become used to them faster than anyone would have suspected”.

Yesterday, I read this article in the New York Times by a student who is questioning her own use of technology and specifically her cell phone.

She concludes, “The worst part of my whole experience was realizing that I really am addicted to my phone. One study described Internet addicts as those using the Internet an average of 38 hours per week for nonacademic or non-employment purposes. These days, most people accumulate that many hours before Wednesday. When I have my phone with me, I check it literally every five minutes. This is something that I didn’t even realize until I stopped using it altogether.

So here’s my final take-away: I’m going to spend more time in the real world and less bonding with my phone.”

In the video below, college students from St. Joseph’s University tackle the issue with a PSA about Texting Etiquette.

We know this is not just an issue for young people. In our own lives we may notice that either we or others are referring a little too often to that ever present phone. When it comes to using my phone in the presence of others, I consciously try to be respectful of others. This may include turning off my phone or turning the volume off. Even so – I know I can be guilty of this. -Checking email, Facebook, twitter, or answering a seemingly important text.

Perhaps at a meeting a request has been made for everyone to stay off of their phones. Families may set rules for phone use. We are all figuring this out together as we go perhaps.

Banning phones is not the answer. In fact, there are plenty of positive ways to use this technology both in the classroom and out.

What do you think?  Will ‘phone etiquette’ become commonplace? How can we do that if phones are not allowed in school?

Should texting etiquette be part of the digital citizenship or netiquette we teach at school? Perhaps it is – IMHO : )