Digital Citizenship and Literacy

For Organizational and School Leaders, Teacher Leaders and Families

Websites

These sites have resources for teaching Digital Citizenship in the classroom

Google Interactive https://www.google.com/safetycenter/resources/
Google’s Family Safety Center http://www.google.com/goodtoknow/familysafety/
Google Safety Center https://www.google.com/safetycenter/
Common Sense Media http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators
    Unit Assessments – Common Sense Media https://assessments.commonsensemedia.org/
    Digital Compass – (Grades 6 and up) https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/digital-compass
    Student Badges – https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/student-badges
Netsmartzhttp://www.netsmartz.org/educators
NetsmartzSafety Pledges
Be Cyber Wisehttp://www.cyberwise.org/
Digital Citizenship Site http://www.digitalcitizenship.net/
Yahoo Safely http://safely.yahoo.com/
Cable in the Classroom http://www.ciconline.org/DigitalCitizenship
FOSI Family Online Safety Institute http://www.fosi.org/
D
igizen http://www.digizen.org/
W
ebonauts http://pbskids.org/webonauts/about/#
Learning.com – School or District/Diocese Assessments and Curriculum – Subscription
ISTE Standards Nets-A, Nets-S, Nets-T
ISTE Poster and Infographic
S
OS FBI.Gov https://sos.fbi.gov/
Online Safety for Kids @symballo by Sylvia Buller 

Blogs

These blogs address topics related to Digital Citizenship
Anne Collier – Net Family News http://www.netfamilynews.org/
Danah Boyd http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/
Innovative Educator Blog http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/

Research To Know About

Zero to Eight -Children’s Mobile Technology Use in America by Common Sense Media http://www.commonsensemedia.org/research/zero-eight-childrens-media-use-america
Youth Safety on a Living Internet Study – Study
The Good Play Project http://www.goodworkproject.org/research/goodplay/
Pew Internet and American Life Project http://www.pewinternet.org/

Related Posts on TechConnects
Online Safety Bridge Between Home and School – TechConnects
Getting Started with Digital Citizenship – TechConnects

Activity

Using the above links, select resource(s) for use with teachers or students. Discuss the following:
1. Why did you select this resource? What appeals most to you about it.
2. How can it be used in your school(s)?
3. What 3 steps would you need to take to use this resource?
4. How will you measure or evaluate the benefit?

Page Link https://goo.gl/wUrIQZ

QR Code – Scan

Resources

Outsourcing Some of the WorkloadCreative Commons License Joe The Goat Farmer via Compfight

Resources for Technology and Learning

AUPs Catholicedchat WMOF2015
Social Media Educational Technology Planning and Policies for Leadership and Technology
Digital Citizenship Tech Tools  Blogs and Toolkits – K12Blueprint
Evaluating Content and ‘Fake News’ Webtools and Apps Chrome Extensions
Keyboarding

 

NETS – Administrators – National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators
Internet Savvy – Digital Citizenship Resources
Catholic Schools Connect – Connecting Schools

9 Resources for Attending ISTE13 Virtually

For the second time in 10 years, I will not be attending one of my favorite conferences –  the ISTE conference.

Like many others though, I’ll be learning about ISTE from afar. ISTE attendees are by nature prolific tweeters and love to collaborate and share.

In exploring ways to connect and learn along with passionate educators far away at ISTE you may ask:

What are the best ways to follow? How can I connect virtually? What resources can be shared with my colleagues so that they can connect with some of the ideas at ISTE13? How can this learning benefit my students?

7 Resources for Attending ISTE Virtually

  1. Hashtag #ISTE13 – Follow the hashtag for the conference. You will see results from anyone using the hashtag.  If you use the application Tweetdeck to access Twitter, you can create easy to follow columns for any list, search term or hashtag. To connect with others attending virtually use the hashtags #iste13 N.B. Hashtags are not just for twitter Check out Twitter, Facebook, Instagram for the #iste13 hashtag
  2. Hashtag #notatiste – A new hashtag has cropped up this year for talking about not being there. Those following virtually are sharing, posting and adding some humor too
  3. ISTE SocialFacebookTwitterNing
  4. Pinterest: Pinterest added regularly
  5. Full Program Guide – Go to the conference website. Read about the sessions, posters and events. Shared presentation materials are linked too. At the main site, you will also find news feeds, video clips and other updates. Be sure to stop back later as many sessions are video archived for later viewing.
  6. ISTE Unplugged – View the ISTE Unplugged site. It is the unconference or unplugged version of ISTE gatherings and view resources
  7. Rss/Blog Reader – Set up a Feedly RSS reader account to follow bloggers at ISTE. By following via twitter you will be able to find blogs to add to your reader. ISTE has a blogger list you can access or join too.
  8. Mobile Apps – ISTE Mobile App has a list of standards and the ISTE Connects Blog, ISTE Conference App lists sessions and more.
  9. ISTE Remote – ISTE has a pay option which provides access to certain sessions – Schedule

About the ISTE Conference

Sponsored by the International Society of Technology in Education, the ISTE Conference draws close to 20,000 people and is the gathering place for scores of educational technology enthusiasts. Every possible  vendor is there so if you have questions or want to see demos you can connect with them. The vendor floor is full of product samples and representatives ready to answer your every question.

Educators gather to discuss challenges, trends and solutions. Sessions explore successful practice and new ideas.

Connecting with the people though is the real charm of ISTE. That is what makes it great. ISTE is about the people – the passionate educators who bring the best of innovative and tech supported learning to students and willingly collaborate with other educators is what it is all about.

Happily you can explore it before, during and after virtually! Taking advantage of virtual learning is more doable than ever before. As you explore resources and make connections virtually, you are experiencing that connected learning for yourself as well. Here are a few resources. What other resources would you add?

This is cross posted on School CIO – a division of Techlearning

Emerging Technologies to Watch 2013

The newly released 2013 Horizon Report gives us a glimpse into the classrooms of the near future. If you are not familiar with this report, take a close look! How can our schools benefit from this report? All school leaders who focus sharply on emerging technology trends can effectively plan for what students need and how schools can prepare.

By taking the time to look at the information presented, school or organizational leaders will note how quickly these changes are impacting our world and indeed our own lives on a daily basis. As our schools are also greatly affected, action is needed to ready our schools and organizations for the changes ahead.

The Horizon Report has been published since 2002 and is the result of collaborative effort fostered by NMC (New Media Consortium). Released in January, it highlights emerging technology which impact teaching, research, learning and creative inquiry in higher education. A timeline is created which details when these technologies are set to have the most impact in those areas. A K-12 version was recently released in June of 2013. In researching the report international educational leaders across many sectors come together with technologists, business leaders and others. The structure of the report is a compelling one which gives us clear insight into means for implementation.  It is a must read for educators.

 

This video discussed the summary of the higher ed edition of the report

Main Areas of the Horizon Report

  1. Technology Trends with Timeline
  2. Key Trends
  3. Challenges

Key Trends Identified in the Horizon Report

  • Paradigm shift to online programs, hybrid learning and collaborative models
  • Social Media is changing the way people interact, communicate and share or present ideas
  • Openness is becoming valued – via transparency and access to data and information
  • Students are more often bringing their own technology devices to schools due to adjusted school policies and mobile pricing models
  • Abundance of online resources and relationships are contributing to the discussions of a changing role for educators

Emerging Technologies List

  • Cloud Computing – One Year or Less
  • Mobile Learning – One Year or Less
  • Open Content – Two to Three Years
  • Learning Analytics – Two to Three Years
  • 3D Printing – Four to Five Years
  • Virtual and Remote Laboratories – Four to Five Years

Critical Challenges

  • Ongoing professional development must be made part of the culture of schools be applied
  • Educator innovative practice is very important and should be fostered by both policy and attitude
  • New viable virtual and online models of education are available and are challenging traditional models
  • Attention must by paid by K-12 to the increasing blending of both formal and informal learning
  • Personalized learning support needs to be expanded in schools

Tips for Applying the Horizon Report

  1. Distribute to Stakeholders; Parents, Teachers, Board Members and Students (pdf)
  2. Involve curriculum leaders to forge connections to academic aims
  3. Foster ongoing professional development both offered to and delivered by teachers
  4. Form an Innovations Team. Plan regular followup meetings. Share results with school community.
  5. Discuss Trends and Challenges. Share the Communique developed for use with the Horizon Report
  6. Explore Technologies to Watch. View Supporting data, articles and examples
  7. Seek Supporting technologies for academic and organizational goals
  8. Connect with success – Plan to visit or connect with schools applying these technologies
  9. Plan to pilot new technologies. Plan for ongoing evaluation.
  10. Review technology plans and budgets.  As technology evolves our plans and policies must follow suit.
  11. Keep an eye on the horizon. Continue to evaluate new developments. Follow developments and news on the Horizon Report 2013 via Facebook, Twitter #NMchz, Wiki and NMC app.

“In every work of genius, we recognize our once rejected thoughts.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

This yearly report is one I always look forward to. What I find most validates the importance of this study is their past reporting. Take a look back at reports from past years and you will see how on target these reports have been. School and organizational leaders are advised to take a close look at the results of this report and to take action on behalf of the population or the students they serve.

Our students depend on their educational leaders to foster a relevant, engaging learning environment in tune with today’s world. Keeping eyes tuned to the horizon’ will be an essential part of a transformation in tune with what is to come.

 

Related Links

Emerging Technologies to Watch – 2012 on TechConnects

Horizon Retreat Wiki

Horizon Project Main Page

Horizon Project Navigator

COSN – Consortium for School Networking  

This post is crossposted on SchoolCIO a division of TechLearning

5 Classrooms Hearing News on the New Pope

Washington Post via Michael Sohn/AP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As news unfolded recently about the newly elected pope, people around the world were in close touch with the news. Whether via tweets, television, live stream, text or other means, the word traveled fast! This Washington Post article discusses some means of media access and how it has changed over time.

In talking with my son, he recalled being in his 8th grade classroom when Pope Benedict was elected. This memory stayed with him as I am sure thememory of this week’s new papal election will stay with many for years to come.

On the east coast, schools had let out by the time the identity of Pope Francis was announced. They did however, watch prior coverage such as news of the white smoke.  Below are some responses shared on twitter on how classrooms learned this news.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike Rogers school in St. Paul, MN had a chance to learn about the conclave in advance.They were on break when the pope was announced but the surely felt connected to the process because of all of the work they had done in advance.

 

5 Educational Sites for Learning about the Papal Election

As the Papal Conclave gets underway, the web is rich with sites and resources for teaching about the process.  Sorting through the sites for the most accurate and education ones can be quite a challenge. A number of good sites were shared recently in the weekly twitter chat #CatholicEDchat. In this post, I explore some sites and offer a few suggestions for those looking to use them in the classroom.

I recently worked with teachers from a local Catholic school on a professional development day. We explored the of the links below.

How Do They Choose the Pope

This video from Busted Halo explains both the tradition and the process involved in the papal conclave. It tells process succinctly and in an engagingly, interesting way.

 

Adopt a Cardinal

www.adoptacardinal.org – This site allows visitors to randomly generate the name of or ‘adopt’ a Cardinal. It gives facts about the selected Cardinal such as age, location and more. Thanks to @barbinnebraska for this one!

Visual Papal Conclave

http://vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/en/the-vatican/come-si-elegge-il-papa/ -This interactive by the Vatican Insider provides a visual tour of the Vatican along with the conclave process included. It is beautifully done, concise and informational.

 Electing a Pope

http://electingthepope.net/ – This is an educational site created by a group of bloggers, writers and educators. This site is both comprehensive and informative and is a valuable resource for those exploring the topic.

Cardinals Active on Twitter

This list of Cardinals on Twitter is set up by Fr. Roderick. It is an easy to ‘follow’ list which is broken down by country.

Sadlier Prayer Cards –

Classes can download these prayer cards and use them in prayers supporting the Cardinals in the conclave.

As we explored the sites, teachers creatively shared many ideas on how they could use these sites. Also, thanks to Dave M for telling us about the video above!

Ways to Use Papal Conclave Resources in the Classroom

1. Younger Students – Share the Visual Papal Conclave on a large screen or smartboard. Students can listen and learn visually. They can generate questions and explore answers as a class.

2. Teachers can work with a classroom students or groups of students ‘adopt’ a cardinal. They can then do further research on that cardinal and the area he is from. Students can pray for their selected cardinal.

3. Teachers can use the How To Choose video or the comprehensive www.electingthepope.net to use as a springboard for further research. Students can fill out a KWHL chart to check their knowledge and explore questions they may have.

4. Students can role play or re-enact the process to form a deeper understanding and connection. Any of the above resources can inform their work.

5. Students and teachers can follow twitter accounts of cardinals. Although media updates may be at a minimum during the conclave itself, these tweets can prove a valuable resource going forward as the new pope is elected and takes his place in Rome.

I hope these sites are helpful. Please share any sites or lessons that you have found for this purpose.

 

Digital Citizenship Lessons

One topic that continues to be of interest and importance for schools and families is Digital Citizenship. How can we interact safely and appropriately online? The topic of citizenship comes in to play in a very big way. Are we being considerate of others in our words, deeds and actions? Looking out for others both locally and globally online is the trademark of a good ‘digital citizen’.

Today, I spoke with a group of teachers at St. Bernadette School on the topic of safety and digital ciitzeship. The goal of the time we spent together was to explore the many types of resources online for teaching digital citizenship. The school is proactive in aims to educate parents, teachers and students on the topic. They had many great ideas for supporting teachers and parents with online safety and citizenship.

I used a web 2.0 tool called Mentormob to create a playlist of sites. This is an effective tool to use because it allows you to easily add resources. These resources display the webpage and from there you can easily show the site and return quickly to the playlist. It is a nice and interactive way to present various websites.

What resources should be added to this list?

Create your own Playlist on MentorMob!
Related Posts
Getting Started with Digital Citizenship – TechConnects
D is for Digital Citizenship – TechConnects

Skype – No School is an Island

The power of today’s technology is not only in technological capability alone. The difference of technology is in the people connections and empowerment through that technology.

In this post, I will detail some educator and student perspectives on connecting with classrooms via skype. Interestingly, one of the classes profiled here is located in an area called ‘the island city’ in Alameda, California. Teacher Lisa DeLapo said that the Skype classroom connections felt especially meaningful to them given their location. Given that they are in an island type location, students can sometimes feel separate from other schools and students their age. Their skype classroom connections changed that!

We do not exist for ourselves alone – Thomas Merton

I remember the first time my students connected outside of our classroom. It was in the late 90’s and we emailed an author. After a few weeks, the author emailed us back and told students about her writing process. What an amazing feeling it was to reach for the students to reach outside of our classroom and hear directly from an expert – especially one whose books they were reading!

Today the process is easier, faster and quite powerful. The technology of today enables us to use video, voice and images help to enrich the connection. This makes it even more powerful than simple text based exchanges of years gone by.

Skype for Catholic School’s Week – Case Study

I recently had the chance to speak to some teachers and an administrator about a skype connection they established. The Skype calls took place during Catholic Schools Week and included  teachers, students and administrators from various catholic schools across the country. Connection for some of these educators were planned via the twitter chat and hashtag #catholicedchat

No man is an Island – John Donne, Meditation XVII

Teacher and Student Perspectives

Teachers who participated: Barb Gilman, Grade 3, Omaha, Nebraska, Lisa DeLapo, St. Joseph Elementary School , Alameda California Nick Senger, Spokane, Washington and Patti Harju, a 2th grade, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Barb Gilman, 3rd Grade, Omaha, Nebraska

In Skyping with each other, they did an activity called ‘Mystery Skype’. For Mystery Skype, they ask each other a series of five questions with yes or no answers only. This allows student to guess where the other class is calling from. Students must listen closely and think critically to guess the location of the other class. It is fun too!

Comments from Barb’s 3rd grade class:

  • We loved it!
  • We had fun guessing!
  • They were nice.
  • It was exciting.
  • It was awesome.

Barb’s class skyped with Patti Harju’s 2nd graders from St. Stephen’s school in Grand Rapids, MI and Lisa DeLapo’s 3rd graders from St. Joseph’s school in Alameda, California. Barb said,

‘This was our first experience doing a Mystery Skype and I’m hooked! They loved following along in their atlas and coming up with questions.’

Lisa DeLapo, Technology Teacher K-8, Alameda, California

Comments from Lisa’s technology classes:

Third Graders:

  • It was fun asking questions and seeing how different their weather is.  They get to take a day off when it snows!
  • We learned that there are different ways to sing the Alleluia at Mass.
  • We saw the same teacher from last year, but it was a different class.  That was so cool!

Second Graders:

  • It was like magic.  Their classroom was on the screen, and they’re in a different state! – Victor
  • We got to see another Catholic school and the differences between us.  – Santiago

Patti Harju, 2nd Grade teacher, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Comments from Patty’s class:

Patty said, ‘My second graders enjoyed their first two Mystery Skypes with two other Catholic Schools this week. We prepared by looking at our US maps and noticing the locations of the states in relation to the oceans, other countries and directions.

We had a practice round before our chat. I chose a state and the children asked me yes or no questions about the state. They asked about bordering states, whether it gets snow or not, if it is bigger than another state, and if it shares a border with Canada or Mexico. We then wrote some of the questions we liked the best on the board.

During our chat with Barb in Nebraska, we were given clues to the identity of their state and using these clues and the answers to our questions, we were able to identify it. We were also successful with our second chat Lisa’s class in Alameda, Ca. Both schools were also able to identify that we were located in Michigan.

We hope to engage in additional Mystery Skypes this year. The children pay more attention to the map and to the location of the states when they are forming their questions. One of our favorite games to play to learn about the US states is ‘Stack the States’ which we play on our iPads. I love to watch the children consult the US map as they play the game. They are having fun and learning some needed US geography.’

Kathy Mears, NCEA, Executive Director for Elementary Education

Kathy Mears skyped in to talk with faculty at St. Joseph’s in Alameda, California during their faculty meeting.
Technology teacher, Lisa DeLapo said that the teachers really appreciated hearing from Kathy. Lisa noted that teachers felt special that Kathy reached out to them. Kathy happened to call in from a conference rather than from the NCEA office in Arlington, Va. This showed that these connections can happen anywhere and anytime and connect educators in meaningful ways too! Said Kathy:

“It was wonderful! Skype is a tool that we could and should more fully utilize for educational purposes.” NCEA Executive Director for Elementary Education

Getting Started With Skype

  1. Find another classroom to connect with and contact the teacher
  2. Invite the teacher as a contact on Skype
  3. Arrange topics and formulate questions – Students can generate questions also
  4. Plan the time and duration. Note any time differences and plan accordingly.
  5. Determine any related assessment – How will you assess the activity? How will you evaluate effectiveness?
  6. Check connections, peripherals and software – Make sure you have the needed internet access and software. Connect your computer to a speaker or large screen and projector as needed. Do a practice skype call to test the connection in your classroom.
  7. Assign roles to students  so that information is recorded. These may include taking notes, checking connections and more. You can also record the conversation
  8. Get feedback from students
  9. Plan your next classroom connection via Skype
Whether you are on an island or not, take time to reach out to other classrooms. Connect, collaborate and learn together. As Thomas Merton says, ‘we don’t exist for ourselves alone’ and these connections can be meaningful for learning and for building special connections for students and teachers.
Barb’s Wiki – Skype Resources
Wiki for Connecting with other Catholic Schools via Skype – CatholicSchoolConnect
This post is cross posted at NCEA (National Catholic Educational Association) website

 

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Email today for information and pricing.

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Email Nancy Caramanico at TechConnects  to arrange consultation and view sample projects

 

About

Technology can be a tool for empowering each of us. We lead, learn and communicate in new ways each day. I truly believe that keeping in tune with those changes  can help us to grow and work more effectively and make a positive difference in the world especially in education.

A lifelong learner and technology education enthusiast, I help leaders to reach their goals using new technologies. I founded Cara Tec, LLC an independent consulting firm. I have taught online college courses for several schools. I also have taught in the Graduate Educational Leadership programs as an adjunct professor. With 19 years experience in various roles as Digital Content Manager for World Meeting of Families 2015 and the Visit of Pope Francis to Philadelphia, Technology Director K-12, staff developer, I am enthusiastic about the ways in which technology can support all of us in achieving our goals and making positive impact. I use this blog for celebrating and exploring innovative use of digital technology and social media in and for learning.

My other websites

www.nancycaramanico.com

Techspiration

Catholicedchat

Currently Contributing Editor for Acer Education Blog and SchoolCIO sponsored by Tech&Learning

EdTechK-12 Top 50 Blogger, June 2012

As the Director of Technology at the Archdiocese I worked with teachers and administrators in support of learning through technology related programs and tools. I connect with our schools via several online communities and also via my EngageWithTech wiki. I am a former  Director of Technology, K-12 for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia Catholic Schools. (2006-2011)

  • Member of the Advisory Board for School CIO
  • Member of Education Advisory Board, Acer
  • Contributing Author to More Instructional Strategies for Rigor and Relevance distributed by the International Center Leadership in Education
  • Mercy Vocational Board of Education, since 2012

I have an Instructional Technology Educational Specialist Certification and Masters from St. Joseph’s University. I am grateful for the opportunities to learn continually, hearing ideas, solutions and best practices, from others via my own learning network online.
Twitter: ncara

Linked in: Nancy Caramanico

Independent Consulting Services – Cara Tec www.caratechnology.net